Rosma – Geisha- Guatemala

29.00

Milk Chocolate, Elderflower, Apricot, Orange, Apple

COFFEE GRADE: SHG EP
STATION: Finca Rosma
VARIETAL: Geisha
PROCESSING: Washed
ALTITUDE: 1,500 meters
PRODUCER: Fredy Milton Morales Merida
REGION: Huehuetenango 100%
COUNTRY: Guatemala

Tax included (23% IVA)

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Additional information

Finca Rosma was first purchased by Alejandro Morales in 1963. In 1980, his son, Fredy Morales, took over the farm and renamed it Rosma, after his own wife, Rose Mary.When Fredy took over the farm, the only way to transport coffee was to on the back of mules. Together with nearby community leaders, Fredy and the community built a road that makes it easier for producers to transport coffee to market. Another project Fredy undertook was building a pipeline that brings fresh water to the farm from a spring 5 kilometers away. Today, Fredy works alongside his son, Alejandro Jr., who approaches coffee production with the same passion as his father and grandfather.Fredy, Alejandro Jr., and the Rosma team are Cup of Excellence winners and their dedication to producing high-quality coffees is evident in every lot they produce. Just as you'd expect, this Geisha lot is floral and sweet with black tea, yellow fruit and a caramel sweetness. The high altitudes of 1,500 to 1,850 meters above sea level create the ideal warm days and cool nights to promote sweet, dense cherry growth.Cherry is selectively handpicked and ripe, red cherry is processed at the farm’s on-site wet mill. Cherry is pulped and placed in tanks to dry ferment for 42 hours. Workers measure pH every 5 hours and, when pH is near 3.2, it is measured every 30 minutes until the exact pH level is reached. This lot was washed after reaching 2.9 pH. Coffee is washed in washing channels and laid on patios to sundry. After 48 hours, parchment is moved to parabolic beds to dry slowly. Parchment is raked frequently to ensure even drying. It takes approximately 5 to 7 days for parchment to dry. Dry parchment is bagged and transferred to a warehouse in Huehuetenango City, where conditions are excellent for storing dry coffee.